Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Aaron Rodgers' Improvement Is His Own

I have a confession to make: I'm not a big Brett Favre fan.

Don't get me wrong, I do think he's had a great career and he's a clear-cut Hall of Famer.

But my reasoning for not being a big fan doesn't have much to do with Favre's play on the field. Rather, it comes from the way Favre has largely shunned any sort of role as mentor for Aaron Rodgers.

That's why it's particularly frustrating to read an article on Rodgers' noticeable progress this pre-season, in terms of both play and maturity, and see this smack-dab in the middle of it: "Clearly, Brett Favre has rubbed off on him. The Packers hoped that would happen."

The paragraph comes after a discussion of how Rodgers' has ditched the California hair gel he sported out of college for a scruffy beard -- an apparent sign of humility.

Who else sports the scruff look in Green Bay? Well, Brett Favre, of course, so he must be the reason for Rodgers' scruff and his subsequent improved maturity and his subsequent improved play on the field.

It's quite a leap, particularly given the not-so-secret disinterest Favre has for providing Rodgers with that sort of help. Yet, if there's one benefit of not getting help from Favre, it's that Rodgers' improvement and success would be his own.

The Packers media at least needs to let him have that.

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9 Comments:

Anonymous John P said...

Seth:

I used to be a huge Brett Favre, but that changed over the past couple of years. First being all of his retirement talk. You either want to play or you dont. The second were his action regarding Randy Moss, and the last being his lack of mentor attitude with Rodgers.

He seems to have gotten to be a prima dona over the years. Very disapointing in my opinion

August 21, 2007  
Anonymous John P said...

I mean a huge Brett Favre fan. :0

August 21, 2007  
Blogger Seth Zlotocha said...

I agree, John. And, ironically, these last few years have been when Favre's play on the field has warranted a prima dona attitude the least.

I'm certainly no phychologist, but it seems he's just trying to find a way to deal with getting older and, as a result, becoming a less productive quarterback -- criticizing management for a lack of support, refusing to help out a young talent, etc.

August 21, 2007  
Anonymous John P said...

Seth:

You maybe right. It is too bad, even though he is still an icon in this state (I bet he could run for Governor and win), his luster is starting to fade a bit.

August 21, 2007  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Only someone who has never played football could have written this post. Football is not kindergarten, especailly pro football.

These are guys are getting millions to play at a high level and Aaron Rogers needs Favre to hold his hand?

Please - I think Aaron would simply laugh at this post.

August 21, 2007  
Anonymous John P said...

I guess I do not know what getting paid millions of dollars has to do with anything. I think that is kind of irrelavant. I do not think Seth or I are suggesting that Brett Favre hold Aaron's hand, but I do not think it is too much to ask to mentor the kid a little bit. I do not think it matters if you are a CEO, a low level employee or whatever, it is a sign of leadership and team work when you show someone below you the ropes.

I would think that someone in Aaron's position would need this even more, since he is a kid who just received millions of dollars and is under then microscope.

August 21, 2007  
Blogger capper said...

I am still a great big Favre fan, but I agree he could help out Rogers a little more (and Rogers could use all the help he can get). But I also have to agree that Ted Thompson and Mike McCarthy have done Favre no favors with most of their decisions.

August 21, 2007  
Blogger Seth Zlotocha said...

Anon,

I second what John said, and add that part of what makes people in Wisconsin love Favre so much is his apparent commitment to the Green Bay Packers. If he would've ended up going through with his initial reaction to demand a trade after the Packers failed to get Moss, do you think he'd still have as many fans in this state? In other words, there's more to having a fan base than just being a good player, even if that's all it takes to play in the NFL (well, that and not killing dogs).

So, you're right, Favre doesn't need to mentor Rodgers -- I never said he did. All I said was that I'm not a big fan because of his unwillingness to actively help out Rodgers and, subsequently, the Packers' future, which largely rests on Rodgers' shoulders, at this point.

And I wouldn't doubt that Rodgers would say that he doesn't need Favre's active help -- I never said he did. All I said -- and it's right there in the title -- is that the media should let Rodgers' improvement and success be his own rather than continuing to give credit to Favre, particularly when Favre has so blatantly refused to actively be a part of that improvement and success.

August 22, 2007  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

If you want to see a class act mentor, look at Kurt Warner or Trent Dilfer. These guys are not ego maniacs where they refuse to mentor the young talent. In fact they are complete opposites. They are also huge cheerleaders for Linart and Smith on the sidelines. Favre has no such class.

September 14, 2007  

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